Prof CHENG, Sheung-Tak   鄭相德
Chair Professor
Department of Health and Physical Education
Phone No: (852) 2948 6563
Email: takcheng@eduhk.hk
Contact
ORCiD
0000-0003-2923-4217
Phone
(852) 2948 6563
Email
takcheng@eduhk.hk
Address
10 Lo Ping Road, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong
Scopus ID
7404684775
Research Interest
  • Successful aging
  • Elderly depression and suicide
  • Dementia caregivers
  • Social network
  • Activity therapy
External Appointment

Consultancy in the past 3 years

  • Member, Working Group on Active Ageing, Elderly Commission, HKSAR
  • Advisor, Regional Committee for the Prevention of Suicide in the Elderly, Kowloon West Cluster, Hospital Authority
  • Honorary Advisor, Yan Chai Hospital Elderly Services Division
  • Expert Consultant, United Nations Programme on Ageing

Membership of professional societies

  • Member, Gerontological Society of America
  • Life Member, Mental Health Association of Hong Kong
Personal Profile

Sheung-Tak Cheng is Chair Professor of Psychology and Gerontology. He joined the Hong Kong Institute of Education as the founding Head of the Department of Psychological Studies. Besides, he is also an Honorary Professor at the Gender Studies Program, Chinese University of Hong Kong, and an Honorary Chair at the Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia. In addition, he is an Emeritus Member and Issue Matter Specialist of the Global Council on Brain Health, and formerly an expert consultant to the United Nations Programme on Ageing. Locally, he was founding Vice-President of the Chinese Dementia Research Association and a former member of the Working Group on Active Ageing, Elderly Commission, HKSAR Government.

His primary research foci are family gerontology and dementia care. He has published over 150 articles and has edited a book in successful aging. He has pioneered randomized controlled trials of cognitive leisure activities on delaying cognitive decline and interventions to promote positive aspects of dementia caregiving (i.e., the Benefit-Finding Intervention). His work in these areas had led to invited addresses to the World Health Organizations Global Forum on Innovation for Ageing Populations (December, 2013), the International Congress of Psychology (July, 2016), Alzheimer’s Association (Northern California & Northern Nevada Chapter) Annual Updates on Dementia Conference (May, 2016), and the World Dementia Council Summit (Dec, 2018), among others.

He is Associate Editor of Psychology and Aging (2017- ) and Applied Psychology: Health and Well-being (2001- ), and has been a long-standing editorial board members of several major journals in gerontology, including Aging & Mental Health, Research on Aging, and Journal of Applied Gerontology. He is elected Fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), the Association for Psychological Science, and the Gerontological Society of America. He was awarded the Outstanding International Psychologist Award and the Henry David Mentoring Award by APA’s Division 52 in 2007 and 2015 respectively, and was honored in 2008 with the Certificate of Appreciation for Contributions as a Humanitarian Worker that was jointly presented by APA’s Division 48 and Psychologists for Social Responsibility.

Research Interest

  • Successful aging
  • Elderly depression and suicide
  • Dementia caregivers
  • Social network
  • Activity therapy
External Appointment

Consultancy in the past 3 years

  • Member, Working Group on Active Ageing, Elderly Commission, HKSAR
  • Advisor, Regional Committee for the Prevention of Suicide in the Elderly, Kowloon West Cluster, Hospital Authority
  • Honorary Advisor, Yan Chai Hospital Elderly Services Division
  • Expert Consultant, United Nations Programme on Ageing

Membership of professional societies

  • Member, Gerontological Society of America
  • Life Member, Mental Health Association of Hong Kong
Selected Output

Scholarly Books, Monographs and Chapters
Chapter in an edited book (author)
Fung, A.W.T., Cheng, S.-T., & Lai, F.H.Y. (2019). Respite care. In D. Gu & M. Dupre M. (Eds.). ., Encyclopedia of gerontology and population aging (.-.). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.
Márquez-González, M., Cheng, S.-T., & Losada, A. (2019). Coping mechanisms through successful aging. In R. Fernández-Ballesteros, A. Benetos & J.-M. Robine (Eds.), The Cambridge handbook of successful aging (401-425). United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press
Fok, H.-K., & Cheng, S.-T. (2018). Intimate Relationships and Happiness in Asia: A Critical Review. In M. Demir, & N. Sümer (Eds.), Close Relationships and Happiness across Cultures (55-67). Cham: Springer
Wakui, T., & Cheng, S.-T. (2017). Filial Responsibility. In N. A. Pachana (Ed.), Encyclopedia of geropsychology (874-881). Singapore: Springer
Cheng, S.-T., Fung, H. H., Li, L., Li, T., Woo, J., & Chi, I. (2015). Successful aging: Concepts, reflections and its relevance to Asia.. S.-T. Cheng, I. Chi, L. W. Li, J. Woo, & H. H. Fung, Successful Aging: Asian Perspectives (1-20). Netherlands: Springer
Li, T., & Cheng, S.-T. (2015). Family, friends, and subjective well-being: A comparison between the West and Asia. In M. Demir (Ed.), Friendship and Happiness (235-251). Netherlands: Springer
Cheng, S.-T. (2015). Demographic and family trends in Asia. In S.-T. Cheng, I. Chi, H.H. Fung, L.W. Li, & J. Woo (Eds.), Successful aging: Asian perspectives (pp.21-32). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer
Cheng, S.-T., Li, L.W., Woo, J., Chi, I., & Fung, H.H. (2015). Successful aging in Asia: A concerted effort of the state, the family, and the individual. In S.-T. Cheng, I. Chi, H.H. Fung, L.W. Li, & J. Woo (Eds.), Successful aging: Asian perspectives (pp.339-346). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, J.W.H. (2014). Respect, generational concern, and psychological well-being. . In A.C. Michalos (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research (pp.5534-5538). Berlin: Springer
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, J.W.H. (2014). Well-being and filial piety. In A.C. Michalos (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research (pp.7046-7050). Berlin: Springer.
Fung, H.H., & Cheng, S.-T. (2010). Psychology of aging in the land of the panda. In M.H. Bond (Ed.), Handbook of Chinese psychology (2nd ed.) (pp.309-326). Hong Kong: Oxford University Press
Leung, K.-W., Cheng, S.-T., & Ng, S.-S. (2010). Asperger syndrome, humor, and social well-being. . In A. Makinen & P. Hajek (Eds.), Psychology and happiness (pp.143-155). New York: Nova Science Publisher
Phillips, D.R., Chan, A.C.M., & Cheng, S.-T. (2010). Aging in a global context: The Asia-Pacific region.. In C. Phillipson & D. Dannefer (Eds.), Handbook of social gerontology (pp.430-446). London: Sage
Cheng, S.-T., Phillips, D. R., & Chan, A. C. M. (2009). Aging in the Asia-Pacific region: An overview. . In E. Palmore, F. Whittington & S. Kunkel (Eds.), International handbook on aging (pp. 29-54). Santa Barbara, California: Praeger
Cheng, S.-T., & Mak, W.W. (2007). Community psychology in a borrowed place with borrowed time: The case of Hong Kong. . In S. Reich, M. Riemer, I. Prilleltensky & M. Montero (Eds.), International community psychology: History and theories (pp. 200-216). New York: Kluwer
Shong, S.Y.L. & Cheng, S.-T. (2007). Language assessment: A review of cross-cultural issues and the development of an indigenous tool for Hong Kong infants and toddlers. . In E. M. Vargios (Ed.), Educational psychology research focus (pp.191-211). New York: Nova Science Publisher
Textbook (author)
Cheng, S.-T., Chi, I., Fung, H.H., Li, L.W., & Woo, J. (2015). Successful aging: Asian perspectives.. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer

Journal Publications
Publication in refereed journal
Cheng, S.-T., Chen, P.P., Chow, Y.F., Chung, J.W.Y., Law, A.C.B., Lee, J.S.W., Leung, E.M.F., Sim, T.C., Tam, C.W.C., & Cheng, J.O.S. (2022). An exercise cum cognitive-behavioral intervention for older adults with chronic pain: A cluster-randomized controlled trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 90(3), 221-233
Cheng, S.-T., Chen, P.P., Chow, Y.F., Chung, J.W.Y., Law, A.C.B., Lee, J.S.W., Leung, E.M.F., & Tam, C.W.C. (2021). Typology of pain coping and associations with physical health, mental health, and pain profiles in Hong Kong Chinese older adults. Aging & Mental Health, 25(11), 2169-2177
Lam, L.C.W., Lee, A.T.C., Cheng, S.-T., Yip, B.H.K., Chan, W.C., Fung, A.W.T., Ma, S.L., Cheng, C.P.W., Kong, R., Chiu, H.T.S., Lai, F.H.Y., & Wong, S.Y.S. (2021). Mindfulness awareness is associated with a lower risk of anxiety and depressive symptoms in older adults with neurocognitive disorders. Frontiers in Psychiatry. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 12
Yu, S.F.D., Cheng, S.-T., & Kwok, T. (2021). Developing and testing an integrative theoretical model to predict positive aspects of caregiving among family caregivers of persons with dementia: A study protocol. Journal of Advaned Nursing, 77(1), 401-410
Cheng, S.-T., Mak, E.P.M., Kwok, T., Fung, H.H., & Lam, L.C.W. (2020). Benefit-finding intervention delivered individually to Alzheimer family caregivers: Longer-term outcomes of a randomized double-blind controlled trial. The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 75(9), 1884-1893
Yu, S.F.D., Cheng, S.-T., Chow, E.O.W., Kwok, T., & Mccormack, B. (2020). Effects of strength-based intervention on health outcomes of family caregivers of persons with dementia: A study protocol. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 76(10), 2737-2746
Cheng, S.-T. (2020). Will there be a silver lining in the end? Lessons from and reflections on the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong and beyond. . Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 12(S1), S28-S30
Zhang, F., & Cheng, S.-T. (2020). Does exposure to information about dementia change stigma? An experimental study. . Aging & Mental Health, 24(7), 1161-1166
Cheng, S.-T. (2020). The effect of negative aging self-stereotypes on satisfaction with social support. . Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 75(5), 981-990
Cheng, S.-T., & Zhang, F. (2020). A comprehensive meta-review of systematic reviews and meta-analyses on nonpharmacological interventions for informal dementia caregivers.. BMC Geriatrics, 20: 137, pp. 1-24
Cheng, S.-T., Chen, P.P., Chow, Y.F., Chung, J.W.Y., Law, A,C.B., Lee, J.S.W., Leung, E.M.F., & Tam, C.W.C. (2020). Developing a Short Multidimensional Measure of Pain Self-efficacy: The Chronic Pain Self-efficacy Scale-Short Form. The Gerontologist, 60(3), e127-e136
Au, A., Lai, D.W.L., Biggs, S., Cheng, S.-T., Haapala-Biggs, I., Chow, A., & Gallagher-Thompson, D. (2020). Perspective-taking interventions for intergenerational caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease: A randomized controlled trial. . Research on Social Work Practice, 30(3), 306-319
Au, A., Lai, S., Wu, W., Hofer, J., Busch, H., Solcova, I.P., Tavel, P., & Cheng, S.-T. (2020). Generativity and positive emotion in older adults: Mediation of achievement and altruism goal attainment across three cultures.. Journal of Happiness Studies, 21(2), 677-692
Cheng, S.-T., & Haley, W.E. (2020). Coping with cognitive impairment and family caregiving: Introduction to the special section. . Psychology and Aging, 35(1), 1-7
Cheng, S.-T., Li, K.-K., Losada, A., Zhang, F., Au, A., Thompson, L.W., Gallager-Thompson, D. (2020). The effectiveness of nonpharmacological interventions for informal dementia caregivers: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis. . Psychology and Aging, 35(1), 55-77
Au, A., Yip, H.-M., Lai, S., Ngai, S., Cheng, S.-T., Losada, A., Thompson, L., & Gallagher-Thompson, D. (2019). Telephone-based behavioral activation intervention for dementia family caregivers: Outcomes and mediation effect of a randomized controlled trial. . Patient Education and Counseling, 102(11), 2049-2059
Cheng, S.-T., Chen, P.P., Chow, Y.F., Chung, J.W.Y., Law, A.C.B., Lee, J.S.W., Leung, E.M.F., & Tam, C.W.C. (2019). The Pain Catastrophizing Scale—short form: Psychometric properties and threshold for identifying high-risk individuals.. International Psychogeriatrics, 31(11), 1665-1674
Cheng, J.O.S., & Cheng, S.-T. (2019). Effectiveness of physical and cognitive-behavioural intervention programmes for chronic musculoskeletal pain in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.. PLoS One, 14(10), e0223367
Yu, D.S.-F., Li, P.W., Zhang, F., Cheng, S.-T., Ng, T.K., & Judge, K.S. (2019). The effects of a dyadic strength-based empowerment programs on the health outcomes of people with mild cognitive impairment and their family caregivers: A randomized controlled trial. . Clinical Interventions in Aging, 14, 1705-1717
Cheng, S.-T., Chan, W.C., & Lam, L.C.W. (2019). Long-term outcomes of the benefit-finding group intervention for Alzheimer family caregivers: A cluster-randomized double-blind controlled trial.. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(9), 984-994
Cheng, S.-T., Ma, D.Y., & Lam, L.C.W. (2019). A brief measure of predeath grief in dementia caregivers: The Caregiver Grief Questionnaire.. International Psychogeriatrics, 31(8), 1099-1107
Steffen, A.M., Gallagher-Thompson, D., Arenella, K., Au, A., Cheng, S.-T., Crespo, M., Cristancho-Lacroix, V., Lopez, J., Losada, A., Marquez-Gonzalez, M., Nogales-Gonzalez, C., & Romero-Moreno, R. (2019). Validating the Revised Scale for Caregiving Self-Efficacy: A cross-national review. . The Gerontologist, 59(4), e325-e342
Cheng, S.-T., Au, A., Losada, A., Thompson, L.W., & Gallagher-Thompson, D. (2019). Psychological interventions for dementia caregivers: What we have achieved, what we have learned. . Current Psychiatry Reports, 21(7), 59, pp., 1-12
Fung, A.W.T., Lee, A.T.C., Cheng, S.-T., & Lam, L.C.W. (2019). Loneliness interacts with family relationship in relation to cognitive function in Chinese older adults. International Psychogeriatrics, 31(4), 467-475
Cheng, C.P., Cheng, S.-T., Tam, C.W., Chan, W.-C., Chu, W.C., & Lam, L.C. (2018). Relationship between cortical thickness and neuropsychological performance in normal older adults and those with mild cognitive impairment. Aging and Disease, 9(6), 1020-1030
Cheng, S-T. (2018). Therapeutic mechanism(s) of the benefit-finding intervention for dementia caregivers: a reply to Cantó. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 26(12), 1281-1282
Cheng, C.P., Lam, L.C.W., & Cheng, S.-T. (2018). The effects of integrated attention training for older Chinese adults with subjective cognitive complaints: A randomized controlled study. Journal of Applied Gerontology, 37(10), 1195-1214
Cheng, S.-T., Leung, C.M.C., Chan, K.L., Chen, P.P., Chow, Y.F., Chung, J.W.Y., Law, A.C.B., Lee, J.S.W., Leung, E.M.F., & Tam, C.W. (2018). The relationship of self-efficacy to catastrophizing and depressive symptoms in community-dwelling older adults with chronic pain: A moderated mediation model. PLoS One, 13(9), e0203964
Cheng, S.-T., & Lam, L.C.W. (2018). Improving diagnostic communication in dementia. International Psychogeriatrics, 30(8), 1149-1152
Cheng, S.T. (2018). The Principles and Techniques of Benefit-Finding for Dementia Caregivers: Reply to Gersdorf. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 26(3), 405-406
Yu, D.S.F., Cheng, S.-T., & Wang, J. (2018). Unraveling positive aspects of caregiving in dementia: An integrative review of research literature.. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 79, 1-26
Chung, L.M.Y., Fong, S.S.M., Ma, A.W.W., Cheng, S.T. (2018). Integration of behavioural feedback in web-based systems nutrition learning among university students. . Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 10.1111/jcal.12249, 1-8
Cheng, S.T., Chan, K.L., Lam, R.W.L., Mok, M.H.T., Chen, P.P., Chow, Y.F., Chung, J.W.Y., Law, A. C.B., Lee, J.S.W., Leung, E.M.F., & Tam, C.W.C. (2017). A multicomponent intervention for the management of chronic pain in older adult: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Trials, 18 (1), 528-.
Cheng, S.-T. (2017). Dementia caregiver burden: A research update and critical analysis. Current Psychiatry Reports, 19(9), art. no. 64, 1-8
Cheng, S.-T. (2017). Self-perception of aging and satisfaction with children’s support. Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 72(5), 782-791
Li, K.-K., Ng, L., Cheng, S.-T., Fung, H.H. (2017). Reverse message-framing effects on accelerometer-assessed physical activity among older outpatients with Type 2 diabetes. Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 39(3), 222-227
Xing, C., Zhang, X., & Cheng, S.-T. (2017). Would more social partners lead to enhanced health? The paradox between quantity and quality. PsyCh Journal, 6(3), 219-227
Cheng, S.-T., Mak, E.P.M., Fung, H.H., Kwok ,T., Lee, D.T.F., & Lam, L.C.W. (2017). Benefit-finding and Effect on Caregiver Depression: A Double-blind Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 85(5), 521-529
Lu, H., Ma, S.L., Wong, S.W.H., Tam, C.W.C., Cheng, S.-T., Chan, S.S.M., & Lam, L.C.W. (2017). Aberrant Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity within Default Mode Network and its Relationships with Neurocognitive Features in Cognitively Normal APOE ϵ 4 Elderly Carriers. International Psychogeriatrics, 29(5), 805-814
Hou, W. K., Lau, K. M., Ng, S. M., Cheng, S. T., Shum, T. C. Y., Cheng, A. C. K., & Cheung, H. Y. S. (2017). Savoring moderates the association between cancer-specific physical symptoms and depressive symptoms. Psycho-Oncology, 26, 231-238
Cheng, S.-T. (2016). Cognitive Reserve and the Prevention of Dementia: The Role of Physical and Cognitive Activities. Current Psychiatry Reports, 18:85, 1-12
Cheng, S.-T., Fung, H. H., Chan, W. C., & Lam, L. C. W. (2016). Short-term effects of a gain-focused reappraisal intervention for dementia caregivers: A double-blind cluster-randomized controlled trial. The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(9), 740-750
Cheng, S.-T., Mak, E.P.M., Lau, R.W.L., Ng, N.S.S. & Lam, L.C.W (2016). Voice of Alzheimer Caregivers on Positive Aspects of Caregiving. The Gerontologist, 56(3), 451-460
Cheng, C.P.W., Chan, S.S.M., Mak, A.D.P., Chan, W.C., Cheng, S.-T., Shi, L., Wang, D., & Lam, L.C.W. (2015). Would Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) Enhance the Effect of Working Memory Training in Older Adults with Mild Neurocognitive Disorder due to Alzheimer’s Disease: Study Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial. Trials, 16(479), .-.
Fung, H. H., Li, T., Zhang, X., Sit, I. M. I., Cheng, S.-T., & Isaacowitz, D. M. (2015). Positive portrayals of old age do not always have positive consequences.. Journals of Gerontology, Series B: Psychological Sciences, 70(6), 913-924
Lou, W., Shi, L., Wang, D., Tam, C.W.C., Chu, W.C.W., Mok, V.C.T., Cheng, S.-T. & Lam, L.C.M. (2015). Decreased Activity with Increased Background Network Efficiency in Amnestic MCI during a Visuospatial Working Memory Task. Human Brain Mapping, 36(9), 3387-3403
Cheng, S.-T., Tsui, P. K., & Lam, J. H. M. (2015). Improving mental health in health care practitioners: Randomized controlled trial of a gratitude intervention. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 83(1), 177-186
Cheng, S.-T. (2014). Double compression: A vision for compressing morbidity and caregiving in dementia.. The Gerontologist, 54(6), 901-908
Cheng, S.-T., Lau, R.W.L., Mak, E.P.M., Ng, N.S.S., Lam, L.C.W. (2014). Benefit-finding intervention for Alzheimer caregivers: Conceptual framework, implementation issues, and preliminary efficacy.. The Gerontologist, 54(6), 1049-1058
Wong, A., Cheng, S.-T., Lo, E.S.K., Kwan, P.W.L., Law, L.S.N., Chan, A.Y.Y., Wong, L.K.S., & Mok, V. (2014). Validity and reliability of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire Version (NPI-Q) in stroke or transient ischemic attack patients with cognitive impairment.. Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, 27(4), 247-252
Cheng, S.-T., Kwok, T., & Lam, L.C.W. (2014). Dimensionality of burden in Alzheimer caregivers: Confirmatory factor analysis and correlates of the Zarit Burden Interview.. International Psychogeriatrics, 26(9), 1455-1463
Cheng, S.-T., Leung, E.M.F., & Chan, T.W.S. (2014). Physical and social activities mediate the associatons between social network types and ventilatory function in Chinese older adults. Health Psychology, 33(6), 524-534
Cheng, S.-T. (2014). Response to Park's letter to the editor. . The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(5), 524-525
Cheng, S.-T (2014). Defining successful aging: The need to distinguish between pathways and outcomes. International Psychogeriatrics, 26(4), 527-531
Cheng, S.-T., Chow, P.K., Song, Y.-Q., Yu, E.C.S., & Lam, J.H.M. (2014). Can leisure activities slow dementia progression in nursing home residents? A cluster-randomized controlled trial. International Psychogeriatrics, 26(4), 637-643
Wong, A., Cheng, S. T., Lo, E. S. K., Kwan, P. W. L., Law, L. S. N., Chan, A. Y. Y., Wong, L. K. S., & Mok, V. (2014). Validity and Reliability of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire Version in Patients With Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Having Cognitive Impairment (doi: 10.1177/0891988714532017). Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, Retrieved from http://jgp.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/04/23/0891988714532017.abstract, online publication, online
Hui, A.N.N., Yeung, D.Y.L., Sue-Chan, C., Chan, K., Hui, D.C.K., & Cheng, S.-T (2014). Gains and losses in creative personality as perceived by adults across the lifespan. Developmental Psychology, 50(3), 709-713
Li, K.-K., Cheng, S.-T., & Fung, H.H. (2014). Effects of message framing on self-report and accelerometer-assessed physical activity across age and gender groups. Journal of Sports and Exercise Psychology, 36(1), 40-51
Cheng, S.-T., Chan, T.W.S., Li, G.H.K., & Leung, E.M.F (2014). Childlessness and subjective well-being in Chinese widowed persons. The Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 69(1), 48-52
Cheng, S.-T., Chow, P.K., Song, Y.-Q., Yu, E.C.S., Chan, A.C.M., Lee, T.M.C., & Lam, J.H.M. (2014). Mental and physical activities delay cognitive decline in persons with dementia. . The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 22(1), 63-74
Chou, K.-L., Zarit, S.H., & Cheng, S.-T. (2014). Families and well-being in East Asia: A special section.. Aging & Mental Health, 18(1), 1-3
Chan, K., Hui, A., Cheng, S.-T., & Ng, Y.-L. (2013). Perceptions of age and creativity in the workforce. . The Journal of Creative Behavior, 47, 256-272
Cheng, S.-T., Lam, L.C.W., Kwok, T., Ng, N.S.S., & Fung, A.W.T. (2013). The social networks of Hong Kong Chinese family caregivers of Alzheimer's disease: Correlates with positive gains and burden. The Gerontologist, 53(6), 998-1008
Cheng, S.-T., Chou, K. L., & Zarit, S.H. (2013). Dementia in Asia: Introduction to a special section. . Aging & Mental Health, 17(8), 911-914
Cheng, S.-T., Ip, I.N., Kwok, T. (2013). Caregiver forgiveness is associated with less burden and potentially harmful behaviors. Aging & Mental Health, 17(8), 930-934
Cheng, S.-T., Yu, E.C.S., Chan, L.K., & Wong, M.M.L. (2013). Brief Geriatric Depression Scale as a measure of change in level of depression. . International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 28(11), 1207
Cheng, S.-T., Lam, L.C.W., & Kwok, T. (2013). Neuropsychiatric symptom clusters of Alzheimer's disease in Hong Kong Chinese: Correlates with caregiver burden and depression. . The American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21(10), 1029-1037
Cheng, S.-T., Lum, T., Lam, L.C.W., & Fung, H.H. (2013). Hong Kong: Embracing a fast aging society with limited welfare. . The Gerontologist, 53(4), 527-533
Cheng, S.-T., Lam, L.C.W., & Kwok, T., Ng, N.S.S., Fung, A.W.T. (2013). Self-efficacy is associated with less burden and more gains from behavioral problems of alzheimer’s disease in Hong Kong Chinese caregivers.. The Gerontologist, 53(1), 71-80
Lam, L.C.W., & Cheng, S.-T. (2013). Maintaining long-term adherence to lifestyle interventions for cognitive health in later life.. International Psychogeriatrics, 25(2), 171-173
Cheng, S.-T., Chow, P.K., Yu, E.C.S., & Chan, A.C.M. (2012). Leisure activities alleviate depressive symptoms in nursing home residents with very mild or mild dementia.. American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(10), 904-908
Cheng, S.-T., Lam, L.C.W., & Kwok, T. (2012). Neuropsychiatric symptom clusters of Alzheimer’s disease in Hong Kong Chinese: Prevalence and confirmatory factor analysis of the Neuropsychiatric Inventory.. International Psychogeriatrics, 24(9), 1465-1473
Cheng, S.-T., Lau, R.W.L., Mak, E.P.M., Ng, N.S.S., Lam, L.C.W., Fung, H.H., Lai, J.C.L., Kwok, T., & Lee, D.T.F. (2012). A benefit-finding intervention for family caregivers of persons with Alzheimer disease: Study protocol of a randomized controlled trial.. Trials, 13, 98
Cheng, S.-T., Yip, L.C.Y., Jim, O.T.T., & Lau, A.N.N. (2012). Self-perception of aging and acute medical events in chronically institutionalized middle-aged and older persons with schizophrenia.. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 27(9), 907-913
Lau, R.W.L., & Cheng, S.-T. (2012). Gratitude orientation reduces death anxiety but not positive and negative affect.. OMEGA: Journal of Death and Dying, 66(1), 79-88
Cheng, S.-T., Lam, L.C.W., & Chow, P.K. (2012). Under-recognition of dementia in long-term care homes in Hong Kong.. Aging & Mental Health, 16, 516-520
Lau, R.W.L., & Cheng, S.-T. (2011). Gratitude lessens death anxiety. . European Journal of Ageing, 8(3), 169-175
Cheng, S.-T., Lam, L.C.W., Chan, L.C.K., Law, A.C.B., Fung, A.W.T., Chan, W., Tam, C.W.C., & Chan, W. (2011). The effects of exposure to scenarios about dementia on stigma and attitudes toward dementia care in a Chinese community. . International Psychogeriatrics, 23, 1433-1441
Cheng, S.-T., Lee, K.-K., Leung, E.M.F., & Chan, A.C.M. (2011). Social exchanges and subjective well being: Do sources of positive and negative exchanges matter?. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 66, 708-718
Cheng, S.-T., & Li, K.-K. (2010). Combining major life events and recurrent hassles in the assessment of stress in Chinese adolescents: Preliminary evidence.. Psychological Assessment, 22, 532-538
Cheng, S.-T., Lee, C.K.L. & Chow, P.K. (2010). Social support and psychological well-being of nursing home residents in Hong Kong. International Psychogeriatrics, 22, 1185-1190
Cheng, S.-T., Yu, E. C. S., Lee, S. Y., Wong, J. Y. H., Lau, K. H., Chan, L. K., Chan, H., & Wong, M. W. L. (2010). The Geriatric Depression Scale as a screening tool for depression and suicide ideation: A replication and extension. . American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18(3), 256-265
Cheng, Sheung-Tak; Mak, Emily P. M.; Fung, Helene H.; Kwok, Timothy; Lee, Diana T. F.; Lam, Linda C. W. (2010). Benefit-finding and effect on caregiver depression: A double-blind randomized controlled trial. Journal of Counsulting and Clinical Psychology, 85, 521-529
Chow, P.K., & Cheng, S.-T. (2010). Shame, internalized heterosexism, lesbian identity, and coming out to others: A comparative study of lesbians in mainland China and Hong Kong. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 57(1), 92-104
Cheng, S.-T., Lee, C. K. L., Chan, A. C. M., Leung, E. M. F., & Lee, J.-J. (2009). Social network types and subjective well-being in Chinese older adults. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 64B(6), 713-722
Cheng, S.-T., & Heller, K. (2009). Global aging: Challenges for community psychology. American Journal of Community Psychology, 44(1-2), 161-173
Cheng, S.-T., & Siankam, B. (2009). The impacts of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and socioeconomic development on the living arrangements of older persons in sub-Saharan Africa: A country-level analysis. American Journal of Community Psychology, 44(1-2), 136-147
Cheng, S.-T., Fung, H. H., & Chan, A. C. M. (2009). Self-perception and psychological well-being: The benefits of foreseeing a worse future. Psychology and Aging, 24(3), 623-633
Shong, S. Y. L., & Cheng, S.-T. (2009). Development of a screening instrument for early language delay in Hong Kong Chinese: A preliminary study. The Journal of Genetic Psychology, 170(3), 193-196
Cheng, S.-T. (2009). Generativity in later life: Perceived respect from younger generations as a determinant of goal disengagement and psychological well-being. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 64B(1), 45-54
Cheng, S.-T. (2009). The social networks of nursing-home residents in Hong Kong.. Ageing & Society, 29, 163-178
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, A.C.M. (2008). Detecting depression in mildly demented Chinese adults: The Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale.. Psychiatry Research, 159, 44-49
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, A.C.M. (2008). Validity of the GDS-4 revisited. . Psychology, Health & Medicine, 13, 621-626
Cheng, S.-T., & Kwan, K.W.K. (2008). Attachment dimensions and contingencies of self-worth: The moderating role of culture.. Personality and Individual Differences, 45, 509-514
Cheng, S.-T., & Yim, Y.-K. (2008). Age differences in forgiveness: The role of future time perspective.. Psychology and Aging, 23, 676-680
Cheng, S.-T., Chan, W., & Chan, A.C.M. (2008). Older people’s realisation of generativity in a changing society: The case of Hong Kong. . Ageing & Society, 28, 609-627
Cheng, S.-T., Cheung, K.C.C., & Cheung, C. (2008). Peer victimization and depression among Hong Kong adolescents. . Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64, 766-776
Cheng, S.-T., Fung, H.H., & Chan, A.C.M. (2008). Living status and psychological well-being: Social comparison as a moderator in later life.. Aging & Mental Health, 12, 654-661
Got, I.L.S., & Cheng, S.-T. (2008). The effects of art facilitation on the social functioning of people with developmental disability.. Art Therapy, 25, 50-55
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, A.C.M. (2007). Multiple pathways from stress to suicidality and the protective effect of social support in Hong Kong adolescents. . Suicide & Life-Threatening Behavior, 37, 187-196
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, A.C.M. (2007). Withdrawal, apathy and lack of vigor in later life: Effect on the diagnosis of depression. . Aging & Mental Health, 11, 532-537
Cheng, S.-T., Fung, H.H., & Chan, A. (2007). Maintaining self-rated health through social comparison in old age.. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 62B, P277-P285
Cheng, S.-T. (2006). Negative emotions make positive emotions more salient in well-being appraisal.. Personality and Individual Differences, 40, 557-567
Cheng, S.-T., & (2006). Relationship with others and life satisfaction in later life: Do gender and widowhood make a difference?. Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 61B, P46-P53
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, A.C.M. (2006). Filial piety and psychological well-being in well older Chinese. . Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences, 61B, P262-P269
Cheng, S.-T., & Chan, A.C.M. (2006). Social support and self-rated health:Is there a gender difference in later life?. Social Science & Medicine, 63, 118-122
Cheng, S.-T., Chan, A.C.M., & Fung, H.H. (2006). Factorial structure of a short version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. . International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21, 333-336
Cheng, S.-T., Chan, A.C.M., & Yu, E.C.S. (2006). An exploratory study of the effects of mahjong on the cognitive functioning of persons with dementia.. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 21, 611-617
Tse, M.C., & Cheng, S.-T. (2006). Depression reduces forgiveness selectively as a function of relationship closeness and transgression. . Personality and Individual Differences, 40, 1133-1141

Conference Papers
Invited conference paper
Cheng, S. T. (2010, 6). Caregiver depression: The role of cognitive and noncognitive symptoms of dementia. Invited paper presented at Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference 2010, Hong Kong
Cheng, S. T. (2010, 6). Global trends in dementia: Implications for psychologists. Plenary address to Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference 2010, Hong Kong
Cheng, S. T. (2010, 5). Every cloud has a silver lining: A positive approach to helping dementia caregivers. Paper presented at the 1st Alzheimer’s Disease Conference, Hong Kong
Cheng, S. T. (2009, 7). Older persons and disasters. Invited Symposium Chair, 19th World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris
Cheng, S. T. (2009, 7). Older persons in disasters: A focus on developing countries. Paper presented at the 19th World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Paris
Refereed conference paper
Wong, S., Cheng, R. W-Y., Chu, W. C-W, Kennedy, K., Wang, D., and Cheng, S-T. (2015, 6). The gender difference in the decision-making ability of adolescents: an fMRI study. 21st Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Honolulu, United States
Wong, S., Cheng, R. W, Chu, W. C., Kennedy, K., Wang, D. & Cheng, S-T (2013, 6). Neural mechanism of the undermining effect in adolescents. The 19th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Seattle, USA
Cheng, S. T. (2009, 12). Empowering caregivers: A key to successful dementia care. Plenary address to the 1st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Chinese Dementia Research Association, Hong Kong
Cheng, S. T. (2009, 11). Social exchanges and psychological well-being: Do sources of positive and negative exchanges matter?. Paper presented at the 62nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America, Atlanta, United States
Other conference paper
Cheng, S.-T. (2011, 6). The effects of cognitive stimulation and physical exercise on the cognitive performance of nursing home residents in Hong Kong . Paper presented at the International Society of Advanced Care Planning and End of Life Care Conference, London, U.K.
Cheng, S.-T. (2010, 12). Social support and depression in nursing home residents in Hong Kong . Paper presented at the 2nd HK/UK Joint Psychiatrist Conference, Hong Kong
Cheng, S.-T. (2010, 7). The effects of social exchanges depend on relationship types: A study of Chinese older adults. Paper presented at the 20th International Congress of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Melbourne, Australia

Creative and Literary Works, Consulting Reports and Case Studies
Consulting or contract research report
Cheng, S.-T., Chan, A. C. M., & Phillips, D. R. (2008). Ageing trends in the Asia and the Pacific. In United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (Ed.), Regional dimensions of the ageing situation. New York: United Nations

Project

Nonpharmacological Interventions for Informal Caregivers: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Effects on Symptoms and Functioning of Persons with Dementia
..
Project Start Year: 2021, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Interventions for Sarcopenia in Older Adults: A Pilot Study
We propose a pilot study to compare the effectiveness of an exercise program and nutrition intervention on improving muscle mass, muscle strength and physical performance in Chinese older adults who meet the Asian Working Group of Sarcopenia (AWGS) criteria for sarcopenia.
Project Start Year: 2017, Principal Investigator(s): LAW PUI SZE QUEENIE 羅佩詩 (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
The Management of Chronic Pain in Older Adults: Randomized Controlled Trial of a Physical and Cognitive-behavioral Intervention Program
BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among older adults. Studies elsewhere have shown that physical interventions and psychological methods based on the cognitive-behavioral approach are both effective in alleviating pain. Yet, evidence-based pain management program for older people in Hong Kong is lacking. especially one that incorporates psychological methods. In view of the aging of the population and the prevalence of chronic pain in older adults, there is a need to put together a comprehensive pain management program that combines cognitive-behavioral methods with physical exercise. Such a program should be readily implementable by allied health professionals in general in view of the manpower situation in Hong Kong. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the benefits of a physical and cognitive-behavioral intervention program in alleviating pain intensity, pain-related functional difficulties, and depressive symptoms among older adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain in Hong Kong. DESIGN: Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial. METHODS: A sample of 100 participants aged  60 years will be recruited from social service centers for older people and public medical services. Eligible and consented patients will be first assessed with a face-to-face interview on a battery of questionnaires assessing pain intensity and interference, depressive symptoms, functional health, health-related quality of life, healthcare utilization patterns, and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics. Those meeting the inclusion criteria will be randomized into treatment and active (treatment as usual or TAU) control groups. For the TAU, participants will receive a 10-week chronic pain education program constructed around the contents of a pain information booklet that is disseminated by the Hospital Authority to patients in medical settings [1]. For the treatment group, participants will receive a multimodal intervention of the same duration that is composed of easy-to-implement physical exercises and cognitive-behavioral techniques to manage pain. After the intervention, the same questionnaires would be used to assess effects of the treatment on the primary outcome (pain intensity) as well as the secondary outcome variables (i.e., pain interference, coping, pain cognitions, depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life) at post-intervention and at 3 and 6 months’ follow-up.
Project Start Year: 2016, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
The Prevalence of Chronic Pain and Depression among Chinese Older Adults in Hong Kong
Background: Pain is very common among older adults. Yet, evidence-based pain management services in Hong Kong that address the special needs of the older population are barely existent. One important barrier that hinders the progress in pain management among the elderly is the lack of an effective screening program for psychiatric distress, such as depression, among pain-suffering older adults.
Objectives: To: (1) compare the assessment of pain in elderly patients as rated by family caregivers and the patients themselves, (2) estimate the prevalence of chronic pain among elderly patients, and its psychosocial, clinical, and socio-demographic correlates, and (3) estimate the prevalence of depression among elderly patients with chronic pain and its psychosocial, clinical and socio-demographic correlates. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, observational study.
Methods: A sample of 2,300 consecutive patients aged ³60 years attending public medical services at different public hospitals in Hong Kong will be recruited. Eligible and consented patients will be assessed in a face-to-face interview on a battery of questionnaires assessing pain intensity, depression, mental and functional status, quality of life, healthcare utilization patterns, and clinical and socio-demographic characteristics. Their family caregivers will also be invited to take part in a telephone interview. The primary outcomes of the study are pain intensity and depression. Secondary outcome measures include quality of life, mental and functional status, quality of life, and healthcare utilization patterns.

Project Start Year: 2015, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Toward an Integrative Model of Alzheimer Caregiver Stress: Grief and Burden as Different Pathways to Depression
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Project Start Year: 2014, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Relieving Pain in Older Adults: A Community-based Geriatric Pain Management Project
Due to the non-life-threatening nature of pain, pain management in Hong Kong has never been a public health priority and it is hardly seen on the agenda of healthcare planning. With rapidly aging populations, the global number of people suffering from pain is expected to increase sharply in the decades to come. The urgency to increase professional, government and public awareness of pain in older persons, and to develop better pain management strategies for them is more than apparent.

Currently, evidence-based pain management services in Hong Kong that address the special needs of the older population are barely existent. Although it has been widely recognized that multidisciplinary pain management which incorporates analgesic medication with non-pharmacological approaches such as psychosocial interventions (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy, CBT), physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and alternative medicine, is more effective in pain reduction, pharmacological approach remains to be the mainstay treatment for pain relief among local older patients. In addition to long queuing and waiting time for clinical services, many pain-suffering older adults attending public medical services have difficulties in gaining access to allied medical services such as physiotherapy and clinical psychological services. Given this apparent service gap in the public sector, many older people in Hong Kong do not receive appropriate pain management, resulting in unnecessary suffering.

The mission of the proposed research project is to improve pain management in older persons in Hong Kong. In view of the cultural context of familism, a distinctive feature of this initiative is to include family caregivers in the management of pain in older persons. It is envisaged that improvement of pain management in older persons can only be achieved by the cooperation of patients, their caregivers, and healthcare professionals, public health organizations, and policymakers. Building on this vision, the aim of the project is to develop a community-based multidisciplinary pain management program for older people in Hong Kong. The goals of the research project include:
i. To raise awareness of the under-management of pain problems in older people in Hong Kong.
ii. To alleviate pain in older adults through developing a community-based multidisciplinary pain management program for older people in Hong Kong.
iii. Improvement of knowledge, attitudes, and skills in geriatric pain assessment and management in family caregivers and healthcare professionals.

Project Start Year: 2014, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Age Differences in Cognitive Control and Daily Control Strategies and Emotional Experiences: Implications on Physical and Emotional Health
This project aims to investigate age differences in cognitive control, and control strategies and emotional experiences in daily life, and how these processes impact physical and emotional health over time. In-depth understanding of our everyday experiences is essential for the study of human stress resilience. Older adults relative to younger adults demonstrate higher cortisol levels, report higher positive affect and lower negative affect, and are more motivated to enhance positive emotional states. Older adults also differ from younger adults in coping with stress, for they are more likely to change themselves to fit with environmental demands because of their declining physical and mental resources for goal attainment. This project will significantly contribute to aging and health psychology research by delineating cognition-emotion interactions that characterize human resilience. The potential findings will inform development of age-appropriate, ecologically valid training protocols for enhancing physical and emotional health of people across the adult lifespan.
Project Start Year: 2014, Principal Investigator(s): HOU, Wai Kai 侯維佳 (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
The Role of Coping Flexibility and Its Underlying Mechanism in Chronic Pain Adjustment: A Longitudinal Study
Chronic pain is highly prevalent and remarkably intractable. Medication regimens to control chronic pain and to reduce associated disability have been shown to be insufficient. Pain management strategies that incorporate psychological interventions (e.g., cognitive-behavioral treatment), however, have been shown to be effective in improving patients’ functioning. Most of the evidence on the cognitive-behavioral model of chronic pain supports the pivotal role of pain coping in chronic pain adjustment, but discrepant findings challenge the interpretation that certain pain coping strategies are universally more important to patient functioning than others. Much of the literature has ignored how people assess their control and other contextual factors influencing the dynamic process of pain coping, which may account for inconsistencies in pain coping research. Coping flexibility (the ability to switch coping patterns to optimize coping) has seldom been examined in relation to pain coping, even though the cognitive-behavioral model of chronic pain has its roots in the Transactional model that emphasizes the role of coping flexibility in determining coping quality and adaptive outcomes. In the wider coping literature, a body of evidence has accrued which supports the role of coping flexibility in psychological adjustment. Research also suggests that dispositional intolerance of ambiguity (need for closure) and the ability to choose optimal coping patterns to suit circumstances (discriminative facility) provide the motivational and cognitive basis of coping flexibility respectively. A longitudinal study will address this literature gap by examining the role of coping flexibility and its underlying cognitive and motivational mechanisms in chronic pain adjustment. Using 300 Chinese patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain recruited from three multidisciplinary pain clinics in HongKong, measures of need for closure, discriminative facility, coping flexibility, and adjustment outcomes will be taken at baseline, and at 3- and 6- following baseline. Path analysis will be used to examine the role of pain coping flexibility and its underlying mechanisms in chronic pain adjustment. Hierarchical linear modeling and multivariate analysis of variance will be performed to evaluate the effect of pain coping flexibility on chronic pain adjustment over time. This project will be the first study to evaluate the relationship between appraisal coping flexibility and coping variability, and to incorporate the dual-process model in the study of the underlying mechanisms of pain coping flexibility. The findings will shed light on dispositional differences in pain coping and the design of non-pharmacological strategies to decrease morbidity and control chronicity in local and international contexts.

Project Start Year: 2014, Principal Investigator(s): WONG, Wing Sze 黃穎詩 (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
Cognitive reserve and the prevention of dementia: The role of physical and cognitive activities
Purpose of Review: The article discusses the two most significant modifiable risk factors for dementia, namely, physical inactivity and lack of stimulating cognitive activity, and their effects on developing cognitive reserve. Recent Findings: Both of these leisure-time activities were associated with significant reductions in the risk of dementia in longitudinal studies. In addition, physical activity, particularly aerobic exercise, is associated with less age-related gray and white matter loss and with less neurotoxic factors. On the other hand, cognitive training studies suggest that training for executive functions (e.g., working memory) improves prefrontal network efficiency, which provides support to brain functioning in the face of cognitive decline. Summary: While physical activity preserves neuronal structural integrity and brain volume (hardware), cognitive activity strengthens the functioning and plasticity of neural circuits (software), thus supporting cognitive reserve in different ways. Future research should examine whether lifestyle interventions incorporating these two domains can reduce incident dementia.
Project Start Year: 2012, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Savoring moderates the association between cancer-specific physical symptoms and depressive symptoms
This study investigated the associations of savoring with cancer-specific physical symptoms, psychological distress, and psychological well-being and the moderating effect of savoring in the associations between physical symptoms and psychological outcomes among cancer patients. Methods: A total of 263 Chinese adults recently diagnosed with cancer (mean time since diagnosis = 43.72 days, SD = 38.20) were recruited and administered a questionnaire assessing cancer-specific physical symptoms, perceived capability of savoring the moment, psychological distress, and psychological well-being within six months following diagnosis. Results: Structural equation modeling revealed significant associations of savoring with physical symptoms and psychological distress and well-being (β = −0.41–0.54, p < 0.0001). Savoring significantly moderated the association between physical symptoms and depressive symptoms. Simple slope tests revealed that the association was not significant at higher levels of savoring (estimate = 0.15, z = 0.49, p = 0.62) whereas it was stronger at lower (estimate = 1.11, z = 4.81, p < 0.001) and medium (estimate = 0.63, z = 3.04, p < 0.01) levels of savoring. The effects of demographic and medical covariates were controlled for in all models. Conclusions: The findings suggest that savoring is positively associated with physical and psychological functioning among people with cancer. The link between physical symptoms and depressive symptoms could be exacerbated at lower levels of savoring. Fostering savoring beliefs and practices could be a significant psychological component of symptom management among cancer patients.
Project Start Year: 2012, Principal Investigator(s): HOU, Wai Kai 侯維佳 (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
The Role of Social Cognition in Support Provision and Adjustment in Cancer Caregiving: A Longitudinal Analysis
Advances in treatment have substantially prolonged the lifespan of people with cancer. As cancer care shifts from hospitals to home or community settings, family caregivers face the difficulty of providing various kinds of support. They also shoulder the life-and-death responsibility for the patients. Despite the need to support cancer caregivers and reduce the risks of poor adjustment among them, very little research has been conducted in Chinese societies. This 12-month prospective study aims to examine the biological basis and social cognitive and supportive processes of adjustment among Chinese family caregivers of cancer patients in Hong Kong.
Project Start Year: 2012, Principal Investigator(s): HOU, Wai Kai 侯維佳 (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
The Role of Social Cognition in Support Provision and Adjustment in Cancer Caregiving: A Longitudinal Analysis
Advances in treatment have substantially prolonged the lifespan of people with cancer. As cancer care shifts from hospitals to home or community settings, family caregivers face the difficulty of providing various kinds of support. They also shoulder the life-and-death responsibility for the patients. Despite the need to support cancer caregivers and reduce the risks of poor adjustment among them, very little research has been conducted in Chinese societies. This 12-month prospective study aims to examine the biological basis and social cognitive and supportive processes of adjustment among Chinese family caregivers of cancer patients in Hong Kong.
Project Start Year: 2012, Principal Investigator(s): HOU, Wai Kai 侯維佳 (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
Voices of Alzheimer caregivers on positive aspects of caregiving.
Purpose: To discover positive gains as constructed by family caregivers of relatives with Alzheimer's disease. Design and Methods: Fifty-seven Hong Kong Chinese primary caregivers provided 669 diary recordings over an 8-week period, describing daily events and experiences in which positive gains were achieved. The diaries were analyzed independently by two researchers using thematic analysis. Results: Ten themes related to positive gains were identified: (a) insights about dementia and acceptance of the condition, (b) a sense of purpose and commitment to the caregiving role, (c) feelings of gratification when the care-recipient (CR) was functioning relatively well, (d) mastering skills to handle the CR, (e) increased patience and tolerance, (f) cultivating positive meanings and humor amidst difficult circumstances, (g) letting go of things, such as when the CR's qualities had been lost or personal agenda had become unrealistic, (h) developing a closer relationship with the CR, (i) finding support, and (j) feeling useful helping other caregivers. Implications: In addition to treating negative outcomes such as depression, practitioners and researchers should, identify means to promote positive gains. Strategies mentioned in the caregivers' diaries, such as reframing stressful situations in a more positive light, may provide input into the design of such interventions.
Project Start Year: 2011, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
A Benefit-finding Intervention for Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Disease
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Project Start Year: 2010, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Aberrant interhemispheric functional connectivity within default mode network and its relationships with neurocognitive features in cognitively normal APOE ϵ 4 elderly carriers
Background: Default mode network (DMN) is vulnerable to the effects of APOE genotype. Given the reduced brain volumes and APOE ϵ 4-related brain changes in elderly carriers, it is less known that whether these changes would influence the functional connectivity and to what extent. This study aimed to examine the functional connectivity within DMN, and its diagnostic value with age-related morphometric alterations considered.
Methods: Whole brain and seed-based resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) analysis were conducted in cognitively normal APOE ϵ 4 carriers and matched non-carriers (N=38). The absolute values of mean correlation coefficients (z-values) were used as a measure of functional connectivity strength (FCS) between DMN subregions, which were also used to estimate their diagnostic value by receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves.
Results: APOE ϵ 4 carriers demonstrated decreased interhemispheric FCS, particularly between right hippocampal formation (R.HF) and left inferior parietal lobular (L.IPL) (t=3.487, p<0.001). ROC analysis showed that the FCS of R.HF and L.IPL could differentiate APOE ϵ 4 carriers from healthy counterparts (AUC value=0.734, p=0.025). Moreover, after adjusting the impact of morphometry, the differentiated value of FCS of R.HF and L.IPL was markedly improved (AUC value=0.828, p=0.002).
Conclusions: Our findings suggest that APOE ϵ 4 allele affects the functional connectivity within posterior DMN, particularly the atrophy-corrected interhemispheric FCS before the clinical expression of neurodegenerative disease.

Project Start Year: 2010, Principal Investigator(s): LU, Hanna (CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德 as Co-Investigator)
 
Benefit-finding and effect on caregiver depression: A double-blind randomized controlled trial.
Objective: To examine the effects of using cognitive reappraisal to find positive gains on caregivers' depressive symptoms, burden, and psychological well-being. Method: Ninety-six caregivers of persons with Alzheimer's disease were randomly assigned to receive a benefit-finding intervention or 1 of 2 treatment-as-usual conditions, namely, simplified psychoeducation (lectures only; SIM-PE) or standard psychoeducation (STD-PE). Each participant received 4 biweekly interventions of 3 hr each, over a 2-month period, at home. Results: Results showed that benefit-finding participants reported lower depressive symptoms after treatment, when compared with either SIM-PE (d = -0.46) or STD-PE (d = -0.50) participants. They also reported less role overload when compared with STD-PE participants (d = -0.46). Self-efficacy in controlling upsetting thoughts was a mediator for some of the treatment effects. Conclusion: Finding positive gains is an effective intervention to reduce depressive symptoms among Alzheimer caregivers. © 2017 APA, all rights reserved.
Project Start Year: 2010, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Caregiver Burden, Depression, and Social Support: Relations to Dementia Severity and Behavioral, Cognitive and Functional Problems in Persons with Alzheimer Disease
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Project Start Year: 2010, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
Short-term effects of a gain-focused reappraisal intervention for dementia caregivers: A double-blind cluster-randomized controlled trial.
Objective: To examine the effects of a benefit-finding intervention, the key feature being the use of gain-focused reappraisal strategies to find positive meanings and benefits in caring for someone with dementia. Methods: In a cluster-randomized, double-blind, controlled trial conducted in social centers and clinics, 129 caregivers aged 18 + and without cognitive impairment, providing at least 14 care hours per week to a relative with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease, and scoring ≥ 3 on the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were studied. Exclusion criterion was care recipient having parkinsonism or other forms of dementia. The benefit-finding intervention was evaluated against two treatment-as-usuals, namely, simplified psychoeducation (lectures only) and standard psychoeducation. Each intervention lasted 8 weeks, with a 2-hour session per week. Randomization into these conditions was based on center/clinic membership. Primary outcome was depressive symptom. Secondary outcomes were Zarit Burden Interview, role overload, and psychological well-being. Self-efficacy beliefs and positive gains were treated as mediators. Measures were collected at baseline and post-treatment. Results: Regression analyses showed benefit-finding treatment effects on all outcomes when compared with simplified psychoeducation and effects on depressive symptoms and Zarit burden when compared with standard psychoeducation. Effect sizes were medium-to-large for depressive symptoms (d = −0.77 to −0.96) and medium for secondary outcomes (d = |0.42–0.65|). Furthermore, using the bootstrapping method, we found significant mediating effects by self-efficacy in controlling upsetting thoughts and positive gains, with the former being the primary mediator. Conclusion: Finding positive gains reduces depressive symptoms and burden and promotespsychological well-being primarily through enhancing self-efficacy in controlling upsetting thoughts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved)
Project Start Year: 2010, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
A Benefit-finding Intervention for Family Caregivers of Persons with Alzheimer Disease
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Project Start Year: 2009, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德
 
A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Therapeutic Effects of Tai Chi and Mahjong on Older Persons with Cognitive Impairment
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Project Start Year: 2008, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Sheung-Tak 鄭相德