Dr CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca   鄭穎怡
Principal Lecturer
Department of Psychology
Phone No: (852) 2948 8787
Email: rwycheng@eduhk.hk
Contact
ORCiD
0000-0002-3110-7607
Phone
(852) 2948 8787
Email
rwycheng@eduhk.hk
Address
10 Lo Ping Road, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong
Scopus ID
16041291000
Research Interest

Achievement motivation (including goal orientation, efficacy, self-concept), Project-based learning, Cross-cultural research, Positive education

External Appointment

Dr. Cheng is the School Supervisor of the School Management Committee of EdUHK Early Childhood Learning Centre and the School Manager of the Incorporated Management Committee of EdUHK Jockey Club Primary School. She has been invited as the mentor of the Mentorship Programme in HKU SPACE Community College since 2007.

Personal Profile

Dr. Cheng obtained her PhD at the University of Hong Kong. Her research is focused on educational psychology, specifically on student achievement motivation and positive education. She has been working on research projects on goal orientation, academic self-concept, social comparison processes in school settings, project-based learning, and cross-cultural comparison. She is the Consulting Editor of the journal Educational Psychology. She is the reviewer of a number of international journals including Contemporary Educational Psychology, Learning and Instruction, Learning and Individual Differences, and British Journal of Educational Psychology. She has been teaching educational psychology and research methods at the university.

Research Interest

Achievement motivation (including goal orientation, efficacy, self-concept), Project-based learning, Cross-cultural research, Positive education

External Appointment

Dr. Cheng is the School Supervisor of the School Management Committee of EdUHK Early Childhood Learning Centre and the School Manager of the Incorporated Management Committee of EdUHK Jockey Club Primary School. She has been invited as the mentor of the Mentorship Programme in HKU SPACE Community College since 2007.

Selected Output

Scholarly Books, Monographs and Chapters
Research book or monograph (author)
Ho, C. S. H., Chan, D. W. O., Chung, K. K. H., Tsang, S. M., Lee, S. H., & Cheng, R. W. Y. (2007). The Hong Kong Test of Specific Learning Difficulties in Reading and Writing for Primary School Students (2nd ed.). Hong Kong: Hong Kong Specific Learning Difficulties Research Team.
Chapter in an edited book (author)
鄭穎怡 (2019)。 〈目標訂定〉。輯於石美寶、李子建和姚偉梅(編), 《迎接未來的四大能力―家長與孩子一起踏上成功之路》 (28-35)。香港: 中華書局(香港)有限公司
鄭穎怡 (2019)。 〈自主學習〉。輯於石美寶、李子建和姚偉梅(編), 《迎接未來的四大能力―家長與孩子一起踏上成功之路》 (19-27)。香港: 中華書局(香港)有限公司
Cheng, R. W. Y., Leung, B. F. H., & McInerney, D. M. (2019). Social goal orientation, behavioral engagement and coping of Hong Kong Chinese students.. In G. A. D. Liem, & S. H. Tan (Eds.), Asian education miracles: In search of sociocultural and psychological explanations (pp.29-44). New York: New York: Routledge.
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Fung, W. K. (2017). Academic achievement of Hong Kong Chinese students: Motivational perspective.. In M. C. W. Yip (Ed.), Cognition, metacognition and academic performance: An East Asian perspective. (40-52). London: Routledge.
Lam, B. H., Cheng, R. W. Y., & Yang, M. (2017). Formative feedback as a global facilitator: Impact on intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and positive affect. Kong, S. C., Wong, T.L. & Yang, M., Chow, C. F., & Tse, K. H., Theories and emerging practices in scholarship of learning and teaching in higher education in a digital technology era (265-288). Singapore: Springer
Cheng, R. W. Y., Shu, T. M., Zhou, N., & Lam, S. F. (2016). Motivation of Chinese learners: An integration of etic and emic approaches. In R. B. King, & A. B. I. Bernardo (Eds.), The Psychology of Asian Learners: A Festschrift in Honor of David Watkins (355-368). Singapore: Springer
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Phillipson, S. N. (2013). Goal orientations and the development of subjective action space in Chinese students. In S. N. Phillipson, H. Stoeger, & A. Ziegler (Eds.), Exceptionality in East-Asia: Explorations in the actiotope model of giftedness (pp.114-131). London: Routledge
Lam, S. F., & Cheng, R. W. Y. (2007). Special education in Hong Kong. In C. R. Reynolds & E. Fletcher-Janzen (Eds.), Encyclopedia of special education: A reference for the education of children, adolescents, and adults with disabilities and other exceptional individuals, 3rd ed., Vol. 2, (pp.1055-1057). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons
Textbook (author)
McInerney, D. M., Cheng, R. W. Y., & Lai, P. Y. (2010). Utilize motivation to fulfill potentials: Tips for teaching and learning (in Chinese). Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing

Journal Publications
Publication in refereed journal
Tang, E., Cheng, R. W. Y., & Fung, W. K. (2021). Perceived parental stress in face of kindergarten children’s academic setback: Roles of parents’ goals and education. European Journal of Psychology of Education, 36, 439-451
Fung, W. K., Chung, K. K. H., & Cheng, R. W. Y. (2019). Gender differences in social mastery motivation and its relationships to vocabulary knowledge, behavioral self-regulation, and socioemotional skills.. Early Education and Development, 30(2), 280-293
Wong, S. W. L., Cheng, R. W. Y., Chow, B. W. Y., & Chung, S. M. C. (2019). The link between a set a tangram-based tasks and Chinese and English reading and related skills among Chinese kindergarteners.. AERA Open, 5(1), 1-14
Wong, S.W.L., Miao, H., Cheng, R.W.Y., & Yip, M.C.W. (2017). Graphic Novel Comprehension among Learners with Differential Cognitive Styles and Reading Abilities. Reading & Writing Quarterly, 33, 412-427
Fung, W. K., & Cheng, R. W. Y. (2017). Effect of school pretend play on preschoolers’ social competence in peer interactions: Gender as a potential moderator. . Early Childhood Education Journal, 45(1), 35-42
Cheng, R. W-y., McInerney, D. M., & Mok, M. M. C. (2014). Does Big-Fish-Little-Pond Effect always exist? Investigation of Goal Orientations as Moderators in the Hong Kong context (DOI:10.1080/01443410.2014.898740). Educational Psychology, 34(5), 561-580
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Lam, S. F. (2013). The interaction between social goals and self-construal on achievement motivation. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 38, 136-148
McInerney, D. M., Cheng, R. W-y., Mok, M. M. C., & Lam, A. K. H. (2012). Academic self-concept and learning strategies: Direction of effect on student academic achievement. Journal of Advanced Academics, 23(3), 249-269
Cheng, R. W. Y. (2012). Lessons from goal orientation theory: Expansion of systemic theory of gifted education. High Ability Studies, 23(1), 31-33
Lam, S. F., Cheng, R. W. Y., & Choy, H. C. (2010). School support and teacher motivation to implement project-based learning. Learning and Instruction, 20(6), 487-497
Lam, S. F., Cheng, R. W. Y., & Ma, W. Y. K. (2009). Teacher and student intrinsic motivation in project-based learning.. Instructional Science, 37, 565-578
Cheng, R. W. Y., Lam, S. F., & Chan, J. C. Y. (2008). When high achievers and low achievers work in the same group: The roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 78 (2), 205-221
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Lam, S. F. (2007). Self-construal and social comparison effects. British Journal of Educational Psychology, 77, 197-211

Conference Papers
Refereed conference paper
Cheng, R. W. Y., McInerney, D. M., Lam, S. F., & Mok, W. S. Y. (2015, 7). Externally versus internally regulated social goal orientation: Predictions on motivation and emotion. Paper presented at the International Conference on Studies in Humanities and Social Sciences (ICSHSS'15), Phuket, Thailand
Mok, W. S. Y., Cheng, R. W. Y., McInerney, D. M., & Lam, S. F. (2015, 6). How would fulfillment of obligation to parents affect emotion? An experimental study. Paper presented at the Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference, Hong Kong
Wong, S., Cheng, R. W-Y., Chu, W. C-W, Kennedy, K., Wang, D., and Cheng, S-T. (2015, 6). The gender difference in the decision-making ability of adolescents: an fMRI study. 21st Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Honolulu, United States
Cheng, R. W. Y., McInerney, D. M., Lam, S. F., & Leung, B. F. H. (2014, 8). Development and validation of social goals instrument in Chinese culture. Paper presented at the International Conference on Education, Psychology, and Social Sciences (ICEPS 2014), Taipei, Taiwan
Wong, S.W.L., & Cheng, R.W.Y. (2014, 5). The application of Chinese tangram for the estimation of emergent literacy skills by parents. . Paper presented in the 2014 annual meeting of the British Psychological Society conference. Birmingham, United Kingdom., UK
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Phillipson, S. N. (2013, 9). Integrate goal orientations with the Actiotope Model of Giftedness. . Paper presented at the Third International Conference on Talent Development and Excellence (ICTDE 2013), Antalya, Turkey
Cheng, R. W. Y., McInerney, D. M., & Lam, S. F. (2013, 8). Goal orientation in Chinese culture: An inductive approach.. Paper presented at the 10th Biennial Conference of Asian Association of Social Psychology, Indonesia
Miao, H. Y., Wong, S.W.L., & Cheng, R. W. Y. (2013, 6). The visual-perceptual correlates of literacy skills among Chinese-English bilingual preschoolers in Hong Kong. The Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference, Hong Kong
Wong, S., Cheng, R. W, Chu, W. C., Kennedy, K., Wang, D. & Cheng, S-T (2013, 6). Neural mechanism of the undermining effect in adolescents. The 19th Annual Meeting of the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, Seattle, USA
Mok, M. M. C., McInerney, D. M., & Cheng, R. W.-Y. (2011, 8). Using Multidimensional Rasch Modelling to Enhance Measurement Precision: The Case of Self-Processes Scales. European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI) Conference 2011: Education for a Global Networked Society, Exeter, United Kingdom
Cheng, R. W. Y., McInerney, D. M., Mok, M. M. C., & Lam, K. H. (2011, 6). Does big-fish-little-pond effect always exist? Investigation of moderators in the Hong Kong context.. Paper presented at the Sixth SELF Biennial International Conference, Quebec City
McInerney, D. M., Mok, M. M. C, Cheng, R, W., & Lam, A. K. H. (2011, 4). Academic self-concept and learning strategies: Direction of effect on student academic achievement. Paper presented at the American Educational Research Association 2011 Annual Meeting, New Orleans, Louisiana
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Lam, S. F. (2010, 7). Development and validation of teacher motivation scale in project learning. Paper presented at the 7th Conference of the International Test Commission, Hong Kong
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Lam, S. F. (2009, 1). Social goals and achievement motivation: A cross-cultural comparison. Paper presented at the Fifth SELF International Biennial Conference, Al Ain, UAE
Other conference paper
Cheng, R. W. Y., & Lam, S. F. (2008, 6). What is the purpose of studying? The effects of social goals and self-construal on achievement motivation. Paper presented at the Joint Chinese Psychologist Conference and The Hong Kong Psychological Society Annual Conference 2008, Hong Kong

Project

Piloting a multi-layered interface exchange mechanism among professionals, master students and undergraduate students to enhance students' meta-cognitive awareness and reflective capacity
This project aims to enhance the learning effectiveness of two professional study courses by engaging university students in an interface exchange among different student groups and primary school teachers. The project tightens the link between theory and practice as the instructor apply metacognitive awareness and reflective capacity in designing the learning context of the targeted courses.
Project Start Year: 2020, Principal Investigator(s): LAM, Bick Har 林碧霞 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Early Advancement in Social-emotional Health and Positivity (EASP)
Research into positive education has shed lights into understanding the psychological and social factors associated with individuals’ optimal functioning, psychological well-being, and social-emotional competence (Cheung, Leung, Chung, & Cheung, 2018; Kwong et al., 2018; Li & Lau, 2019). Social-emotional competence refers to skills that help individuals manage their own emotions, understand the feelings and perspectives of others, and interact with others in positive ways. These skills are important as they build the foundation for formal learning in schools, ranging from kindergartens to universities. However, relatively little research attention has been placed on understanding how positive education could improve the way teachers and parents can optimise pre-school children’s social emotional development. This project will draw on the PROSPER framework which stands for Positivity, Relationships, Outcomes, Strengths, Purpose, Engagement, and Resilience (Ambler, Anstey, McCall, & White (2017). This framework includes model of wellbeing and achievement (Positive emotions, Engagement, Relationships, Meaning, Accomplishment, Strengths and Resilience). Under this framework, we will examine whether the 2x2 model of perceived social influence (Chan et al., 2019) will promote individual wellbeing into teacher education and further empower positive learning environment at preschool and home.
Project Start Year: 2020, Principal Investigator(s): CHUNG, Kevin Kien Hoa 鍾杰華 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Team Member)
 
Online Experiential Learning in Research Methods in Psychology
The purpose of the project is to develop an electronic teaching package to offer students opportunities to serve as research participants in exemplar research studies that adopt different kinds of experimental design in different areas of psychology. The exemplar studies will simulate the research studies published in journal articles. Participation in authentic research represents an experiential learning which is meaningful, applicable and lifelike. Students’ active involvement in the research process helps enhance their learning of the research methods concepts.
Project Start Year: 2019, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡
 
Designing Dissonances, Fallacies and Contrasting Situations to Recraft Students' Pedagogical Reasoning in Professional Studies Courses
This project aims to enhance students’ pedagogical reasoning in the targeted courses. It aims to design dissonances, fallacies and contrasting situations in a variety of learning and teaching activities for the targeted courses to enable students to learn in an inquiry learning approach. The project is expected to enhance the overall learning effectiveness, and motivation of learning of students, share instructional materials across Faculties/Departments, and develop scholarship of teaching.
Project Start Year: 2019, Principal Investigator(s): LAM, Bick Har 林碧霞 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Enriching Graduate Attributes Through Non-Formal Learning Across Programmes
This project is for the students of HOD, PSY and ECE programmes in the light of their varying but complementary disciplinary knowledge and skills. Each team will comprise at least one student from each of the three programmes, the participants can also learn to cross-fertilize perspectives of different disciplines and apply learned theories and knowledge. Colleagues of C&I, Psy and ECE will work together to provide guidance to students regarding the planning and implementation of the activities and participant’s reflections of the outcomes, understanding, collaboration and mutual support among the departments will be enhanced. Survey will be conducted to assess participants’ learning.
Project Start Year: 2017, Principal Investigator(s): CHEUK-WONG, Kwok Sai Tricia 黃國茜 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Comics as Assistive Tools for Reading and Learning Development: A Meta-Analysis
This project summarizes the outcomes of learning through reading comic.
Project Start Year: 2017, Principal Investigator(s): YIP, Chi Wing Michael 葉志榮 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Creating a Situated Learning Environment for Constructing Knowledge
This project is to research and experiment a ‘situated learning’ learning model through activities that promote learning by doing, in a community of practice; to enhance the effectiveness of learning and teaching of the courses on areas related to students’ generic skills development.
Project Start Year: 2017, Principal Investigator(s): LAM, Bick Har 林碧霞 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Good Teaching Practice – Incorporation of Development of Generic Skills into Course Teaching at Higher Education Context
The present project is related to Community of Practice (CoP). It aims to promote good teaching practice with the focus of incorporating the generic intended learning outcomes (GILOs) in course teaching and develop a peer sharing atmosphere on campus. It engages our colleagues in sharing and exchanging their teaching experience through an online platform.
Project Start Year: 2015, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, May Hung May 鄭美紅 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Team Member)
 
The Complexity and Dynamics of Social Goals: An Investigation of a Hidden Dimension of Hong Kong Student Motivation
The effects of mastery goals and performance goals have been widely documented in previous research on motivation. Students who pursue mastery goals do schoolwork to acquire knowledge while students who pursue performance goals do schoolwork to demonstrate ability. However, recent studies have increasingly indicated a need to include social goals in the investigation so as to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of achievement motivation (Dowson & McInerney, 2001, 2003, 2004). This is especially true in Chinese culture which emphasizes interdependence among individuals. Chinese students,when compared with non-Chinese students, are believed to have strong social reasons to achieve academically, such as to fulfill their social obligations to parents and family, and to obtain social approval from peers and teachers (Hau & Ho, 2010; Li, 2002, 2005; Tao & Hong, 2000). Despite the importance of social goals in Chinese culture, there has been little research on the topic. Our project seeks to make a special contribution as it looks into an important, yet hidden and uncharted area in Chinese students’ achievement motivation.

We shall use a quantitative approach in this two-year project. In the first half of the first year, we shall design and validate a culturally appropriate survey instrument to capture the social goals for learning held by Hong Kong students. The target participants are 3,000 Hong Kong seventh- to twelfth-graders from 6 secondary schools with high, medium and low levels of academic achievement. In the second half of the first year we shall administer the purposely designed survey of social goals along with some pre-existing and validated instruments developed in the West to capture students’ endorsement of different types of goals. We shall also administer the measures that tap students’ educational outcomes, including behavioral (achievement scores), cognitive (learning strategies) and affective (utility value of education) outcomes. The target participants are 1,200 Hong Kong seventh-graders and 1,200 ninth-graders from 6 secondary schools with high, medium and low levels of academic achievement. In the second year, we shall re-administer the whole set
of measures twice to the same group of students. This 18-month longitudinal study with cross-lagged and cross-sectional designs will help establish the test-retest reliability of the newly developed social goals scale, examine students’ developmental changes of the endorsement of different types of goals and most importantly allow causal modeling that investigates how goal endorsement is related to student educational outcomes across years.

The major focus of the study is to critically examine the role of social goals when controlling for mastery and performance goals and to address the thorny issue of whether social goals are performance based, mastery based, or a cluster of variables with their own dynamics within the Asian Hong Kong Chinese context. This project sheds light on a new theoretical framework of achievement motivation that goes beyond mastery and performance goals. It also provides practical implications on instructional strategies for the enhancement of
students’ academic motivation through harnessing the hidden dimension of social goals.

Project Start Year: 2014, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡
 
Studying Formative Feedback Strategies to Enhance Student Learning Outcomes
Formative feedback is generated by teachers as strategies to engage learners to constantly reflect on how they can approach, orient, and evaluate learning, which leads to successful learning outcomes. This project adopts a quasi-experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of formative feedback strategies on students’ academic and psychological outcomes. A sample of students will be invited to join the experimental group (with specific formative feedback strategies) or control group (without specific formative feedback strategies). The psychological outcomes and academic outcome will be assessed to inform the effectiveness of the strategies, by a questionnaire and content analysis of students’ course work.
Project Start Year: 2013, Principal Investigator(s): LAM, Bick Har 林碧霞 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Promoting Good Practice in Teaching through AClass
This project aims to support the ongoing development of a professional development website known as Active Classroom (AClass, http://www.ied.edu.hk/aclass/) that serves to provide research-based, pilot-tested teaching materials and collaborative action research output. The website AClass was set up in 2006 and has been used by school principals, teachers, university professors, and the Institute for teacher professional development and training. The theme of this project is“Enhancing Teaching Excellence through AClass”, the project intended to further extended its scope and audience from the school community to the higher education community. More courses have been added to the website to accommodate the needs of educational development in a new direction for promoting pedagogical innovations and active and engaged learning.
Project Start Year: 2013, Principal Investigator(s): LAM, Bick Har 林碧霞 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
The complexity and dynamics of social goals: An investigation of a hidden dimension of Hong Kong student motivation
The purpose of the research is to investigate social goals within the framework of achievement goal theory. Specifically, we would like to achieve the following objectives: a) To identify the structure and dimensions of social goals for academic outcomes held by Hong Kong students based on interviews with students, parents and teachers; b) To design and validate, through both classical and item response theory, an instrument that measures the emic level of social goals held by students based on the data obtained from interviews; c) To use the purpose designed social goals instrument to investigate student endorsement of different types of social goals in comparison to mastery and performance goals; d) To examine the effect of different types of social goals held by students on desired educational outcomes, including behavioral (achievement scores), cognitive (learning strategies) and affective (utility value of education), when controlling for mastery and performance goals; e) To analyze the longitudinal changes of students’ social goals and their relations to educational outcomes over time; f) To explore the gender and school band differences in the nature, salience and predictive power of social goals on educational outcomes.
Project Start Year: 2011, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡
 
Optimizing the Potential of Hong Kong Students: Harnessing the Interaction Between Psychological Variables and Student Achievement
There is ample international research evidence that students’ school achievement is significantly affected by their self-concept, self-regulated learning, future goals, achievement goals, basic values, perceived value of schooling, learning strategies, and motivation. Nevertheless, there has not been any study that has looked into the effects on achievement of these variables when taken together. Nor has there been any research into the joint effects on achievement of these psychological variables on schooling outcomes. As such, despite the pervasive significance of these variables for the realization of full potential (see, for example, McInerney & Van Etten, 2004; Marsh, Craven & McInerney, 2007), current practices in school settings have not fully capitalized on advances in research demonstrating the importance of these variables. The following question will be addressed: What is the nature of and relationships between academic achievement and psychological factors over time for secondary students in Hong Kong?
Project Start Year: 2010, Principal Investigator(s): MCINERNEY, Dennis Michael 麥翰林 (CHENG, Wing Yi Rebecca 鄭穎怡 as Co-Investigator)
 
Social Goals and Achievement Motivation: The Role of Classroom Climate
The current research is one of the pioneering studies that investigates social goals within the framework of achievement goal theories. We narrow down the definition of social goals with respect to peers and classify social goals into two types: positive social goals (doing schoolwork because of peer relationships) and negative social goals (not doing schoolwork because of peer relationships). The purpose of the research is to identify the antecedents (social need and classroom climate) and motivational outcomes (effort, persistence, fear of achievement and self-presentation of low achievement) of both types of social goals.
Project Start Year: 2008, Principal Investigator(s): CHENG Wing Yi Rebecca
 
Prizes and awards

President's Award for Outstanding Performance in Administrative Services (Team Award)
( http://p-awards.eduhk.hk/FEHD&PS.php )The President’s Award for Outstanding Performance in Administrative Services was established to recognise and reward University staff members, individually and in teams, who demonstrate exemplary performance in areas such as administration, information technology, project management, outreach and other support functions not directly related to teaching and research. To support the University’s successful achievement of its “Education-plus” vision, the Department of Psychology and Faculty of Education and Human Development Team worked diligently to complete two challenging, high-stake exercises, namely the Re-accreditation of Programme of the Bachelor of Social Sciences (Honours) in Psychology [BSocSc(Psy)], and Programme Area Accreditation (PAA) in Psychology. The achievements represent an important milestone in the University’s pursuit of full self-accrediting status for disciplines complementary to education.
Date of receipt: 14/5/2018, Conferred by: The Education University of Hong Kong